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20121006
20121014
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KPIX (CBS) 4
WUSA (CBS) 2
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Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
CBS
Oct 7, 2012 6:00pm PDT
environment. air pollution regulations require special summer and winter gasoline blends in the state. refineries are making that seasonal switch now. but that reduces supply which was already tight after a fire in august shut down part of a chevron refinery at richmond near san francisco. then last week a power failure temporarily knocked out an exxon refinery at torrance in southern california. >> the richmond refinery and torrance refinery account for about 25% of the production in california because they are two of the biggest refiners we have. it is easy to see why the wholesalers panic. >> as wholesalers raise prices, drivers started to panic as gas seemed to get more expensive by the hour. >> i just don't see it going down any time soon. >> reporter: state energy officials are trying to reassure drivers that price spikes like this don't last. >> this is a very dramatic one. but we do know that what goes up does come down and often quite quickly. >> reporter: in fact, wholesale prices have started coming down. dropping 55 cents on the spot market in los angeles on friday. but ga
CBS
Oct 5, 2012 5:30pm PDT
below that 8% level but it's still indicative of a slow-growth environment. >> reporter: michelle meyer is senior u.s. economist for bank of america. 100,000 plus jobs is healthy but not impressive. ut and think about what we've come off of, the deepest postwar recession and we're adding about 100,000 or so jobs a month. it's not sufficient. >> reporter: much of the drop in the unemployment rate is due to the growth in part-time jobs. ve i didn't even get responses to my resumes. >> reporter: 56-year-old amy crawford was forced to take a minimum wage job in a chicago restaurant. when she couldn't find full time work as a home designer. >> i'm almost at a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. i'm not confident in the economy. >> reporter: 40% of the enemployed have been out of work six months or more. that number did not drop last dnth. ded chairman ben bernanke said this week his concern is that t iwth just isn't fast enough to put people back to work. >> pelley: anthony, you 5entioned that about 150,000 ngbs are being created each atnth lately. fhat kind of difference does t
CBS
Oct 10, 2012 5:30pm PDT
judgment call. >> and the university is looking foremost to whether or not it has an environment in which african americans or hispanic students don't feel like spokespersons for their races. >> reporter: abigail fisher's lawyer, bert rein, calls college diversity important but not if it discriminates. >> the absence of equal protection was a sin in this country for a long, long time, and we're simply trying to say those rights belong to everybody. >> reporter: several of the justices seem conflicted about that 2003 decision that allows the use of race to achieve college diversity. the author of that decision, sandra day o'connor, was watching these arguments in the courtroom. scott, either way, the future of affirmative action at hundreds of colleges and universities is now in play and riding on this decision. >> pelley: wyatt, as you mentioned, enrollment at the university of texas is nearly 50% white, about 18.5% hispanic, 15% asian and 4.5% black. anna werner found that on the campus, opinions are divided. >> and this is the famous photo. >> reporter: heman sweatt's great uncle went o
CBS
Oct 11, 2012 6:30pm EDT
kind of crop also dependent on water is being threatened by changes in the environment. and john blackstone tells us about that. >> reporter: on the shores of washington state's olympic peninsula, bill deweya a farmer, a shellfish farmer. he's been raising oysters, clams, and muscles for 30 years. >> i'm in shellfish heaven. >> reporter: the hatchery pumps in sea water to nurture baby oysters. this looks just like dark water when you first look at it. >> right. that's what it looks like. but in fact there's 20 million baby oysters in this little tank in front of us here. >> reporter: but suddenly the ocean water is preventing new oysters from forming shells. they die. >> it disostles the shells of the oysters. >> reporter: they're very nucial. he described the die-off to hundreds of scientists in monterey, california. they call is ocean acidification, and with google, produced a globe showing the long-term impact. the deepening red illustrates the expected rise in ocean acid levels over the next three centuries. what is turning the oceans to acid is carbon dioxide from cars and f
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)